Half-rebuilt after a devastating earthquake in 1956, FIRÁ (also known as Hóra) clings precariously to the edge of the enormous caldera. The rising and setting of the sun are especially beautiful when seen here against the Cycladic buildings lining the clifftop, and are even enough to make battling through the high-season crowds worthwhile. Although Firá’s restaurants are primarily aimed at the tourist market, the food can be very good; views of the crater add considerably to the price. Similarly accommodation isn’t cheap and rooms facing the caldera tend to be particularly expensive.

Using a spectacular two-hour footpath along the lip of the caldera you reach the village of Imerovígli and further to the north Firostefáni, both of which have equally stunning views and prices. The only alternative location, where you don’t have to pay as much for the view, is Karterádhos, a small village about twenty minutes’ walk southeast of Firá.

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