Scotland sports such a strong selection of tourist attractions – from castles and cabers to kilts and whisky – it’s easy to forget that there is much more to this land. Venture away from the cities and you’ll find rugged mountains, remote glens and mile-upon-mile of wave-lashed beaches. Ready to explore? Here are seven Scottish places that you’ve probably never heard of, but must visit.

1. The Isle of Harris, the Western Isles

Located 40km off Scotland’s far northwest coast, the Isle of Harris boasts a string of bleached-white sands so glorious they’ve been compared to the Caribbean’s finest beaches. There are ample stretches of perfect sand to choose from: our favourites are Luskentyre, Seilebost and the wide sweep of Scarista. You will often have these beaches all to yourself, and even if someone dares to break your solitude, you can just wander along to the next one.

Isle of Harris, beach, Scotland, UKIsle of Harris, Scotland by iknow-uk on Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

2. The Quiraing, Isle of Skye

It may look like the gnarled New Zealand countryside which doubled so superbly as the setting for the Lord of the Rings films, but this Tolkienesque landscape is actually on Scotland’s Isle of Skye. Sheer rock faces, twisted stacks, piercing pinnacles and unlikely erratic boulders combine to conjure up an otherworldly scene that looks truly spectacular on a sunny day. It’s even more dramatic when Skye’s notorious mists creep in.

Great Britain, Scotland, Isle of Skye, view over the Quiraing areaa

3. St Kilda, the Western Isles

St Kilda is an archipelago so impressive that it became the first place in the world to be recognised by the UNESCO World Heritage list for both its natural heritage (it’s home to the unique Soay sheep and the St Kilda field mouse) and its human history (its inhabitants lived a unique communal life until it was abandoned in 1930).

To get here, you have to endure an often (very) bumpy boat ride across forty miles of ocean from the Western Isles, but the sheer cliffs and striking rock formations are worth the effort.

Cleit on Hirta with Soay lamb, Scotland, UKCleit on Hirta with Soay lamb by Irenicrhonda on Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

4. Foula, the Shetland Islands

Few Scots have even heard of the UK’s most remote inhabited isle, and there’s little wonder why: there are less than forty hardy Foula locals.

Getting here is an adventure in itself, with a twenty-mile boat journey from the Shetland mainland to the island’s rocky harbour, across a stretch of water frequently lashed by wild Atlantic storms.

Venture out across the rugged and wild interior and you can see bonxies (huge skuas) and arctic terns swooping above your heads in summer. Or, enjoy a picnic by the sea as you watch orcas hunt for seals on rocky shores that even the Romans never conquered. They dubbed Foula the Ultima Thule, or the end of the known world, when they spied it in the distance.

Foula post office, Scotland, UKFoula post office by neil roger on Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

5. Cairngorms National Park, the Highlands

Despite being the UK’s largest national park – and home to the largest mountain plateau in the UK – Cairngorms National Park is one of the least-visited. This vast, inhospitable wilderness often looks more like the Arctic than Scotland, with snow drifts swirling in hurricane-force winds during winter, and ice and snow lingering in places right through summer.

It feels a world apart, too, as you ramble across a lunar landscape where the UK’s only wild reindeer herd roam and the wrecks of crashed WWII aircraft lie frozen in time. The plateau is a paradise for well-prepared walkers in summer, while skiers and snowboarders take over in winter.

Summit Plateau of Cairngorms

6. Loch Torridon, the Highlands

Fancy a visit to the Norwegian fjords? Well, save yourself some cash and head to Wester Ross, which offers the fjord-like delights of little-known Loch Torridon. This mighty sea loch spreads its tentacles from the small village of Torridon, flanked by the natural amphitheatre of the Torridon Mountains, which tower over 1000m-high.

The clear, cobalt-blue waters and lack of development mean marine life is bountiful here – look out for seals, dolphins and, as you get closer to the open sea, whales. You can stay at the SYHA hostel, the relaxed Torridon Inn or the seriously posh mock baronial Torridon Hotel, which has the best of the spectacular loch views.

Loch Torridon, sunrise, Scotland, reflectionsLoch Torridon, sunrise by Steve Schnabel on Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

7. Thurso, the Highlands

Let’s talk surfing. We all know about Australia’s Bondi beach and the brilliant waves in Bali – but what about Thurso? It’s usually a case of donning a drysuit rather than wetsuit here, but the coastline around the Highland town of Thurso packs a serious punch in the world of surfing.

Unsuspecting walkers are often surprised to find the surreal spectacle of a dozen surfers lying out in the Pentland Firth, looking to catch some of the serious waves you get in these tumultuous waters, the Orkney Isles just visible behind them in the distance. The conditions are so good that a volley of surf championships have been held here, including two world championships for kayak surfing.

Surfing in Thurso, Scotland, UKThurso Reef by Dave Ellis on Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Explore more of Scotland with the Rough Guide to Scotland. Header image via Pixabay/CC0.

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