In the 1800s, Tremé, the historic African American neighbourhood where jazz was developed in the bordellos of Storyville – long since gone – was a prosperous area, its shops, businesses and homes owned and frequented by New Orleans’s free black population. By the late twentieth century, however, blighted by neglect and crime, Tremé had become a no-go zone. Despite this, its rich tradition of music, jazz funerals and Second Lines (loose, joyous street parades, led by funky brass bands and gathering dancing “Second Lines” of passers-by as they go) continued, and the turn of the millennium saw signs of gentrification. While many of its houses remain in bad shape post-Katrina, David The Wire Simon’s HBO series Tremé, which premiered in 2010, brought the area appreciated visibility.

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