On April 29, 1903, a good portion of Turtle Mountain tumbled down onto the little mining town of Frank. The term “slide” doesn’t do it justice: nineteen million tonnes of limestone crashed down with enough ferocity to cause lightning and trap so much air that many of the rocks could effectively “surf” on it across the valley. This was Canada’s deadliest rockslide, with well over a hundred people buried under the rubble, but amazingly no miners were killed – they dug themselves out after fourteen hours of toil.

The legacy of the disaster lies in a vast, rocky wasteland on either side of the highway and railway line and below Turtle Mountain, whose contours were once riddled with the galleries of local mines.

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