On April 29, 1903, a good portion of Turtle Mountain tumbled down onto the little mining town of Frank. The term “slide” doesn’t do it justice: nineteen million tonnes of limestone crashed down with enough ferocity to cause lightning and trap so much air that many of the rocks could effectively “surf” on it across the valley. This was Canada’s deadliest rockslide, with well over a hundred people buried under the rubble, but amazingly no miners were killed – they dug themselves out after fourteen hours of toil.

The legacy of the disaster lies in a vast, rocky wasteland on either side of the highway and railway line and below Turtle Mountain, whose contours were once riddled with the galleries of local mines.

Book through Rough Guides’ trusted travel partners

Canada features

The latest articles, galleries, quizzes and videos.

7 unusual ways to explore Canada's Bay of Fundy

7 unusual ways to explore Canada's Bay of Fundy

Inscribed as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of North America – rubbing shoulders with perennial favourites such as the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone – Cana…

01 Feb 2018 • Edward Aves insert_drive_file Article
Canada 150+: healing the divide on Spirit Island

Canada 150+: healing the divide on Spirit Island

Canada's 150th celebrations, complete with flags and fireworks, have been in full swing for the entirety of 2017 – but the year has also been a chance to shin…

20 Dec 2017 • Edward Aves local_activity Special feature
20 picturesque Christmas destinations

20 picturesque Christmas destinations

Dreaming of a trip this Christmas? We're here to help. From glittering cities to a few snowy escapes, here are 20 classic destinations for a festive break. …

12 Dec 2017 • Rough Guides Editors camera_alt Gallery
View more featureschevron_right