Generally known as the Ala Napoleonica, the short, western side of the Piazza is partly occupied by the Museo Correr, an immense triple-decker museum with a vast historical collection of coins, weapons, regalia, prints, paintings and miscellanea. Much of this is heavy going unless you have an intense interest in Venetian history, though there’s an appealing exhibition of Venetian applied arts, and one show-stopping item in the form of the original blocks and a print of Jacopo de’ Barbari’s astonishing aerial view of Venice, engraved in 1500. The Quadreria on the second floor is no rival for the Accademia’s collection, but it does set out clearly the evolution of painting in Venice from the thirteenth century to around 1500, and it contains some gems – the most famous being the Carpaccio picture usually known as The Courtesans, although its subjects are really a couple of bored-looking bourgeois ladies.

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