Originally conceived as a convenient way to house the influx of workers in the late 1800s, the Glasgow tenement design became more refined as the wealthy middle classes began to realize its potential. Mainly constructed between 1860 and 1910, these tenements, decked out with bay windows, turrets and domes, were home to the vast majority of Glaswegians for much of the twentieth century, and developed a culture and vocabulary all of their own: the “hurley”, for example, was the bed on castors which was kept below the box bed in an alcove of the kitchen; a “single end” tenement comprised just one room; and the “dunny” was the secluded bottom end of the “close” (entrance way), the perfect spot for games of hide and seek as well as romantic and nefarious encounters.

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