Turin has been home to many major literary figures. Rousseau and Ruskin, Nietzsche, Flaubert and Twain all enjoyed sojourns here. Casanova wrote: “In Turin, the fair sex is most delightful, but the police regulations are troublesome to a degree.” Melville wondered at the architecture, commenting that even the poor breakfasted in elegant coffee shops. But perhaps Turin’s most famous literary resident is Primo Levi. Born at 75 Corso Re Umberto in 1919, Levi graduated in Chemistry from Turin University in 1941 before joining the partisans. Captured by the Nazis in 1944, he spent the rest of the war In Auschwitz. Returning to Turin, he wrote his two masterpieces, If This Is a Man and The Truce. You can visit the Centro Internazionale di Studi Primo Levi at Via del Carmine 13 (wprimolevi.it).

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