Tyneside and Newcastle’s native inhabitants are known as Geordies, the word probably derived from a diminutive of the name ”George”. There are various explanations of who George was (King George II, railwayman George Stephenson), all plausible, none now verifiable. Geordies speak a highly distinctive dialect and accent, heavily derived from Old English. Phrases you’re likely to come across include: haway man! (come on!), scran (food), a’reet (hello) and propa belta (really good) – and you can also expect to be widely referred to as “pet” or “flower”.

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