The “proper” Korean night out has long followed the same format, one that entwines food, drink and entertainment. The venue for stage one (il-cha) is the restaurant, where a meal is chased down with copious shots of soju. This is followed by stage two (i-cha), a visit to a bar; here beers are followed with snacks (usually large dishes intended for groups). Those still able to walk then continue to stage three (sam-cha), the entertainment component of the night, which usually involves a trip to a noraebang room for a sing-along, and yet more drinks. Stages four, five and beyond certainly exist, but few participants have ever remembered them clearly.

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