Insadonggil and its surrounding alleyways are studded with tearooms, typically of a traditional or quirky style. You’ll be paying W5000 or more for a cup, but most come away feeling that they’ve got value for money – these are high-quality products made with natural ingredients, and are likely to come with a small plate of traditional Korean sweets. See Korean tea varieties for some of the teas available; of particular interest are the yak-cha – these dark, bitter, medicinal teas taste just like a Chinese pharmacy smells, and are perfect for chasing away coughs or colds.

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