The most anonymous and least visited of Seoul’s Five Grand Palaces (even locals who work in the area may struggle to point you towards it) is Gyeonghuigung (경희궁; Tues–Sun 9am–6pm; free), which was built in 1616. Lonely and a little forlorn, it’s a pretty place nonetheless, and may be the palace for you if crowds, souvenir shops and camera-dodging aren’t to your liking. Unlike other palaces, you’ll be able to enter the throne room – bare but for the throne, but worth a look – before scrambling up to the halls of the upper level, which are backed with grass and rock.

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