Lake Nakuru was traditionally viewed as a flamingo lake par excellence. Several decades ago, up to two million lesser flamingos (maybe a third of the world’s population) could be seen here massing in the warm alkaline water to feed on the abundant blue-green algae cultivated by their own droppings. However, rising water levels in recent years – due to the significant flooding that has affected all the Rift Valley lakes – have caused a big drop in salinity, and the flamingos have simply flocked elsewhere. This has happened many times in the past (notably in the 1970s and again in the 1990s when the lake water was especially high) and today the majority of the gloriously pink, massed flocks are more easily seen at Lake Bogoria, with scattered communities also at Elmenteita, Magadi and Natron (in Tanzania).

 

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