Incredible aerial images of one of the Amazon rainforest's uncontacted tribes have been released by Survival International. The pictures, taken by photographer Guilherme Gnipper Trevisan on a flight over the Amazon in September, show a Yanomami yano (a communal house) surrounded by dense jungle.

There are around 22,000 Yanomami living in the Brazilian Amazon and this community is home to an estimated 100 people, none of whom have ever had contact with outsiders. They are one of three groups of Yanomami who have chosen to remain isolated.

Image © Guilherme Gnipper TrevisanImage © Guilherme Gnipper Trevisan

Image © Guilherme Gnipper TrevisanImage © Guilherme Gnipper Trevisan

Image © Guilherme Gnipper TrevisanImage © Guilherme Gnipper TrevisanImage © Guilherme Gnipper Trevisan

Survival International's director, Stephen Corry, said: “These extraordinary images are further proof of the existence of still more uncontacted tribes. They’re not savages but complex and contemporary societies whose rights must be respected.

"All uncontacted tribal peoples face catastrophe unless their land is protected. We’re doing everything we can to secure their land for them, and to give them the chance to determine their own futures."

The Yanomami live off the Amazon rainforest: they use over 500 different plants for food, medicine, and construction. But the community are currently at risk of dying out, as their land is being ravaged by illegal gold miners, who have brought disease to the area and contaminated the water.

These images were taken on an overflight led by the Brazilian government to assess the damage the miners have caused.

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