The huge, partially flooded cavern complex comprising Longgong Caves lies 28km from Anshun’s west bus station; you could be dropped at either entrance, which are about 5km apart. From the nearer, western gate, you begin by being ferried down a river between willows and bamboo to a small knot of houses; walk through the arch, bear left, and it’s 250m up some steps to Guanyin Dong (观音洞, guānyīn dòng), a broad cave filled with Buddhist statues. A seemingly minor path continues around the entrance but this is the one you want: it leads through a short cavern lit by coloured lights, then out around a hillside to Jiujiu Tun – site of an old guard post – and Yulong Dong (玉龙洞, yùlóng dòng), a large and spectacular cave system through which a guide will lead you (for free). Out the other side, a small river enters Long Gong (Dragon’s Palace) itself, a two-stage boat ride through tall, flooded caverns picked out with florid lighting, exiting the caves into a broad pool at Longgong’s eastern entrance.

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