Domestic flights arrive at the Mid-Continent Airport, five miles southwest of downtown on W Kellogg Drive; call Best Cabs (t 316/838-2233) for a ride into the city centre. Amtrak trains stop at Newton, a small Mennonite town 25 miles to the north, with a local bus connection to Wichita throughout the day. Greyhound buses come in to 312 S Broadway Ave, two blocks east of Main Street. The resourceful Wichita Convention & Visitors Bureau is in the heart of downtown at Douglas Avenue and Main Street (Mon–Fri 7.45am–5.30pm; t 316/265-2800, w http://www.visitwichita.com), where you can hop aboard a ninety-minute trolley tour (Thurs–Sat 10am; $10; t 316/773-1931, w http://www.rctrolley.com).

Comfortable budget lodging in Wichita is plentiful, especially near the airport on W Kellogg Drive. For something more upmarket, two choice hotels anchor the city’s Old Town entertainment and dining district: the Hotel at Old Town, at First and Mosley streets (t 316/267-4800, w http://www.hotelatoldtown.com; $101–160), has a stylish turn-of-the-twentieth-century flavour, while the Courtyard Wichita at Old Town, a block north at E Second and Mosley streets, was recently converted from a grocer’s warehouse to feature modern amenities galore (t 316/264-5300, w http://www.marriott.com; $101–200).

Top-notch pizzas and own-brewed ales are available at Old Town’s River City Brewing Co, 150 N Mosley St (t 316/263-2739), which hosts local bands every weekend, while Old Mill Tasty Shop, a nostalgic soda fountain at 604 E Douglas Ave (t 316/264-6500), is popular for great sandwiches. Just across the river, cowboy entertainers hoot and holler at Old Cowtown’s Diamond W Chuckwagon Supper (check website for schedule; $30, reservations recommended; t 316/729-4825, w http://www.diamondwchuckwagon.com), where you can fill up on baked beans, honey cornbread, peach cobbler and limitless quantities of smoked beef brisket.

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