Aldo Boglietti, the man behind Resistencia’s sculpture project, aimed at using art to instil civic pride, also founded (in 1943) a remarkable cultural centre called the Fogón de los Arrieros, the city’s most famous attraction. Its name means “The Drovers’ Campfire”, and it’s where artists traditionally came to meet, share their particular art form and then continue their journey. You can visit during the day to look round the eclectic mix of paintings (including works by Fontana and Soldi) and sculptures left behind by visiting artists, but it’s more fun in the evening, when you can have a drink or empanada at the cosy bar. Best of all, try to catch one of the events – concerts, poetry recitals and the like – staged once or twice a week in the main salon or, weather permitting, the patio.

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