The city’s oldest working-class suburb is Haga; once so run-down that demolition was on the cards, today it’s one of Gothenburg’s most enjoyable quarters. The transformation took place in the early 1980s, after someone saw potential in the web of artisans’ homes known as “governor’s houses”, distinctive early nineteenth-century buildings constructed with a stone ground floor and two wooden upper storeys.

Haga is now a miniature version of Greenwich Village, with well-off and socially aware 20- and 30-somethings hanging out in the style-conscious cafés and shops along its cobbled streets.

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