Completely rebuilt after a wartime drubbing, NAGOYA (名古屋) is a modern metropolis of high-rise buildings, wide boulevards, multi-lane highways and flyovers, where business takes precedence over tourism. Here you’ll find the headquarters of industrial powerhouse Toyota as well as numerous other companies that exploit the local skill of monozukuri (making things) to the hilt.

Less overwhelming than Tokyo or Ōsaka, the capital of Aichi-ken and Japan’s fourth-largest city provides an easily accessible introduction to urban Japan and all its contemporary delights, one of the highlights of which is its food scene. The grand Tokugawa Art Museum and attached gardens display possessions of the powerful family who once ruled Japan, and who built Nagoya’s original castle back in 1610. Another highlight is the Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology, an appropriate tribute to Nagoya’s industrial heritage.

Excellent transport links, including an international airport, make Nagoya an ideal base from which to tour the region. Day-trip possibilities include the castle towns of Inuyama and Gifu, both places where you can view the ancient skill of ukai – fishing with cormorants. The Shima Hantō can also easily be visited from Nagoya.

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