On foot, the nearest you can get to North Korean soil without a visa is halfway across the river, on the “broken” bridge in the south of town, next to the new bridge. The Koreans have dismantled their half but the Chinese have left theirs as a memorial, complete with thirty framed photos of its original construction by the Japanese in 1911, when the town was called Andong. The bridge ends at a tangled mass of metal that resulted from American bombing in 1950 during the Korean War. Several viewing platforms are on site, along with pay-telescopes trained on Sinuiju on the far bank. There isn’t much to see on Sinuiju’s desultory shore, save for some rusting ships and curious civilians.

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