In colonial times, the Oued Drâa was the border between the French and Spanish protectorates. The land to the south, the Tarfaya strip, was part of the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, along with the area around Tetouan and Al Hoceima in the north. It was not considered part of Spain’s two Saharan colonies (together known as the Spanish Sahara), of which the northernmost, Seguiat el Hamra, began at the 27°40´ N line just south of Tarfaya, while the southern one, Rio de Oro, began at the 26th parallel, just south of Boujdour. In 1958, two years after the rest of Morocco gained independence, the Spanish gave back the Tarfaya strip, but they kept the Spanish Sahara until November 1975.

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Meknes: the Moroccan city you've never heard of but need to visit 

Meknes: the Moroccan city you've never heard of but need to visit 

With the title of Imperial City and a UNESCO-stamped ancient medina, Meknes can rival the likes of Marrakesh, Rabat, and Fez, yet it struggles to attract the…

08 Dec 2016 • Kirsten Henton insert_drive_file Article
Chefchaouen: Morocco’s best-kept secret

Chefchaouen: Morocco’s best-kept secret

Morocco’s tourist track isn’t well-beaten, it’s been thumped flat. Ask anyone who has been and the chances are they’ll have visited some combination of …

05 Dec 2016 • Greg Dickinson insert_drive_file Article
A day-by-day itinerary for the perfect weekend in Marrakesh

A day-by-day itinerary for the perfect weekend in Marrakesh

The last few years have seen Marrakesh well and truly established as Morocco’s capital of chic, attracting the rich and famous from Europe and beyond. Yet t…

11 Jul 2016 • Rough Guides Editors insert_drive_file Article
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