The ruins of Alexandria Troas, an ancient city founded by Alexander the Great’s general Antigonos I in 300 BC, lie 30km south of Troy, and 2km south of Dalyan village. Excavated since 2000 by archeologists from the University of Münster, the site (unenclosed; free) consists of mostly Roman ruins surrounded by 8km of city wall. A sacred way linked it to Smintheion, while another avenue lined with shops (now uncovered) served the ancient harbour at Dalyan. The modern road roughly bisects the city; just west of this are the site’s most obvious features, including the agora temple, its columns and reliefs set aside for restoration; a huge structure of unknown function; and a partly dug-up odeion with two massive arched entrances. On the other side of the road are a basilica and one of several baths, with clay piping exposed. If the warden is present and you can understand Turkish, a free guided tour is available: if not, you can wander the site at will.

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