Rugged ITHÁKI, Odysseus’s legendary homeland, has yielded no substantial archeological discoveries but it fits Homer’s description to perfection: “There are no tracks, nor grasslands … it is a rocky severe island, unsuited for horses, but not so wretched, despite its small size. It is good for goats.” Despite its proximity to Kefaloniá, relatively little tourist development has arrived to spoil the place. This is doubtless accounted for in part by a dearth of beaches beyond a few pebbly coves, though the island is good walking country, and indeed the interior with its sites from The Odyssey is the real attraction. In the scheme of modern Greek affairs, the island is a real backwater and its inhabitants rather resentful that it is officially a subsection of Kefaloniá prefecture.