The complex of Baroque buildings at the centre of Salzburg exude the ecclesiastical and temporal power of Salzburg’s archbishops, whose erstwhile living quarters – the Residenz – dominate the west side of Residenzplatz. You can take a self-guided audio-tour of the lavish state rooms, and then visit the Residenzgalerie, one floor above, whose collection includes a few interesting paintings, most notably the small, almost sketch-like Old Woman Praying by Rembrandt.

On the east side of Residenzplatz, accessed from Mozartplatz, is the Neue Residenz, built by Archbishop Wolf Dietrich von Raitenau, topped by the Glockenspiel, a seventeenth-century musical clock which chimes at 7am, 11am and 6pm. It now houses the excellent Salzburg Museum, which as well as showing some of the archbishop’s lavish rooms, explores the history of Salzburg, the rediscovery of Salzburg by Romantic painters and the city’s tourist industry.