Ten great British B&Bs on a budget

Ten great British B&Bs on a budget

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Taken from the Best Places to Stay in Britain on a Budget guide, here are ten of the best places to stay across England, Wales and Scotland on a budget.

Old Red Lion, Norfolk

There’s something magical about this simple, welcoming spot. Painted deep red and covered in Virginia creeper, the Old Red Lion sits just outside a gatehouse in the medieval walled village of Castle Acre in northwest Norfolk. Set around a little green, with tea shops, pubs and a couple of shops, this pretty place is a few strides from the long-distance Peddars Way footpath and a perfect stop-off for walkers and cyclists. The owner’s warm-hearted, alternative style infuses the whole place, as you enter through a suntrap courtyard, paved with pebble mosaics, to the main building, where a warren of rooms, from twins to a ten-bed dorm offer simple, cosy lodgings – all pine furnishings and floorboards, colourful duvets and kilim rugs.
Rooms from £50, breakfast included. http://www.oldredlion.org.uk

Hampstead Village Guesthouse, London

A double-fronted Victorian house in a peaceful residential street, the Hampstead Village Guesthouse has grown over the last 35 years from a family home into a charming place to stay. Host Annemarie van der Meer brought up her four children here and it’s extremely kid-friendly, with endless wonders to discover – from the antique sleigh bed in one room to the free-standing bathtub in another – and quirky knick-knacks in every corner. Each of the rooms is different, from “Marc” with a balcony leading onto a roof terrace to “David” with its old fireplace and dark blue painted radiators. The studio, which sleeps five and welcomes dogs, has nautical décor and makes a wonderful sanctuary.
Rooms from £65, breakfast included. http://www.hampsteadguesthouse.com

arthouse b&b, Kent

The arthouse, occupying an old red-brick fire station built around a lofty arched courtyard, has a superb location – it’s on Canterbury’s B&B avenue, London Road, a hop away from the ancient town centre – but very little in common with its chintzy neighbours. The name says it all – owned by artists and designers Anna and John Taylor, the house bears more resemblance to a funky gallery, or a retro magazine shoot than a guesthouse. Their quirky work fills the space with personality and style: from the moment you step in the hallway, adorned with paintings, a trio of weomn’s coats hung as art and jellybean-bright modern chandeliers, you know you’re in for a cool and intriguing experience.
Rooms from £60, breakfast included. http://www.arthousebandb.com

The Porch House, Shropshire

The Porch House, unmissably grand on the sloping main street of the Shropshire town of Bishop’s Castle, is a stunning example of Elizabethan domestic architecture: a stay here is a treat for history lovers or anyone with a penchant for old buildings. The huge, half-timbered house was built in 1564 and the basic structure of wattle and daub and enormous oak beams survives, along with some amazing old features such as the wonky, gleaming oak floorboards. Upstairs, the en-suite rooms are spacious, prettily furnished and full of character and interest and the town itself is a total gem with historic houses, pubs and independent shops.
Rooms from £70, breakfast included. http://www.theporchhouse.com

Pen y Gwyrd, Gwynedd, Wales

There is no better base for Snowdon than this. From outside, Pen y Gwyrd looks unremarkable – except for its superb location beneath Wales’s highest mountain – but inside it’s so defiantly old fashioned that it seems rather hip, and within it lies mountaineering history. A haunt of rock-hoppers since the mid 1800s, Pen y Gwyrd was the training HQ for the successful Everest expedition of 1953 and it positively creaks with its own heritage. The mountaineers (alongside famous names such as Chris Bonington) signed the ceiling downstairs and mementos of the expedition decorate a wood-panelled bar that begs for whisky and chill nights.
Rooms from £80, breakfast included. http://www.pyg.co.uk

Shepherd’s Hut at Crake Trees Manor, Cumbria

A romantic bolthole for two that resembles a sort of tin prairie cabin, the Sheperd’s Hut – designed to be mobile like the nineteenth century originals – is given pride of place in summer, overlooking the farm pond, meadows and barley fields at Crake Trees Manor. Clad in galvanized steel, it looks fiercely utilitarian from the outside and anything but inside, where there’s a lovely, hand-built wooden double bed, pristine white linen with a vintage crochet throw and a floor made of oak. Open the door and you step out onto a little wooden veranda, perfect for star-gazing or an early morning cuppa.
Shepherd’s Hut from £60, B&B rooms in the house from £95, breakfast included. http://www.craketreesmanor.co.uk

Castle Rock, Edinburgh

Locations don’t get any better than this. The super-popular Castle Rock sits right beneath Scotland’s most iconic fortress, Edinburgh Castle, and is within easy staggering distance of the Royal Mile. Unlike some of the Scottish capital’s staid hostels, where the common rooms are quiet and dreary, the emphasis here is firmly on fun and mingling with other guests. The piéce de résistance is the beautiful lounge and reading area, with ornate baroque-style armchairs and an inky-black baby grand piano.
Dorms from £15, private rooms from £45. http://www.castlerockedinburgh.com

The Linen Shed, Kent

This dove-grey clapboard house, raised above the street behind a lush front garden, is not your standard B&B. The house itself, fashioned from a couple of vintage Nissen huts, has been imaginatively restored – light floods in through skylights and French windows, while bare floorboards, weathered wood, muted eau-de-nil and chalky hues create a soft, welcoming feel. This corner of Kent is foodie heaven – even the local pub is a cut above, serving good real ales and tasty meals. Save room for the host’s gourmet breakfast though, and prepare for a wrench when it’s time to leave.
Rooms from £80, breakfast included. http://www.thelinenshed.com

The Big Sleep, East Sussex

A Hollywood-backed designer budget hotel occupying an old Trusthouse Forte on the Eastbourne seafront? This shouldn’t work, but it does – if you can embrace the eccentricities. The faux-fur curtains and photos of John Malkovich (he’s one of the backers) might raise an eyebrow, but the spotless bathrooms, comfortable beds and big windows more than compensate. Go for a suite if you can; all have sea views, some have retro leatherette rocking chairs, one has a standalone claw-foot tub, and a few themed options, with gorgeous statement wallpaper, stray from the minimal design concept. Just strides away from Beachy Head, it’s a splendid spot for anyone looking for peace and quiet on the Sussex coast.
Rooms from £55, breakfast included. http://www.thebigsleephotel.com

Café Alf Resco, Devon

This great little café, B&B and apartment in beautiful Dartmouth is a real bargain. Downstairs, the buzzy café (open 7am-2pm) looks like it should be on the Left Bank; it serves Devon yoghurt, home-made granola, local sausages and excellent coffee from a Gaggia machine, as well as hosting the odd jazz night. The star of the show is upstairs though: a beautiful self-catering apartment with wooden walls and ceiling, a neat gallery kitchen, a miniature balcony with views of the River Dart and a ship’s cabin bathroom.
Rooms from £55, breakfast included. http://www.cafealfresco.co.uk

Find over 250 of the best places to stay in England, Scotland and Wales with Rough Guides’ Best Places to Stay in Britain on a Budget.
Explore all corners of Britain with the Rough Guide to Britain, book hostels for your trip, and don’t forget to purchase travel insurance before you go.